John Hejduk’s A.E. Bye House (1971), included in the League’s exhibition 200 Years of American Architectural Drawing
“The subject of architectural drawings has enjoyed a highly varied history in our century. The modernists of the 1920s and the 1930s, with their uneasiness with history, argued that architectural drawings should be looked upon as documents whose sole purpose is to aid in realizing a built building. Completely opposite that concept is the admiration these same modernist architects and others felt for the drawings of the late 18th-century French Visionary architects–Etienne-Louis Boullée, Claude-Nicholas Ledoux, and Jean-Jacques Lequeu. These designs were almost exclusively projects for buildings that could never have been realized (structurally or economically) at the time. Here the drawings constitute not a means but an end in themselves.” David Gebhard, catalogue introduction
Source.

John Hejduk’s A.E. Bye House (1971), included in the League’s exhibition 200 Years of American Architectural Drawing

“The subject of architectural drawings has enjoyed a highly varied history in our century. The modernists of the 1920s and the 1930s, with their uneasiness with history, argued that architectural drawings should be looked upon as documents whose sole purpose is to aid in realizing a built building. Completely opposite that concept is the admiration these same modernist architects and others felt for the drawings of the late 18th-century French Visionary architects–Etienne-Louis Boullée, Claude-Nicholas Ledoux, and Jean-Jacques Lequeu. These designs were almost exclusively projects for buildings that could never have been realized (structurally or economically) at the time. Here the drawings constitute not a means but an end in themselves.” David Gebhard, catalogue introduction

Source.

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